Davey D's Tumblir
Always Reading Never Planking….

Whatchall know about the History of Funk by Ricky Vincent?

therealeternia:

To u @MrDaveyD re: “F#$K Planking.. start a new trend.. take a picture of urself reading a book.. post that up”

therealeternia:

To u @MrDaveyD re: “F#$K Planking.. start a new trend.. take a picture of urself reading a book.. post that up”

Here’s some beats to hopefully get u thru the day…enjoy

1) Ice Cube Cops Aint Shit explicit

2) Tone Loc     - Us

3) Junior Reed-One Blood-UK

4) The Game     - One Blood (Clean)

5) Buju Banton-Vigilante-Cross hairs rmx-instrumental

6) Buju Banton-Vigilante-Cross hairs rmx

7) Buju Banton-Vigilante-Cross hairs rmx

8) Sister nancy-bambam-instruementel-

original-reggea

9) SisterNancy-BamBam-instrumental-reggea

10) SisterNancy-BamBam-instrumental-reggea

11) SisterNancy-BamBamrmx-reggea

12) SisterNancy-BamBamrmx-reggea

13) SisterNancy-BamBam-instrumental-reggea

14) Mary J Blige w/ Smif and Wessun     - I Love U

15) Mary J Blige w/ Smif and Wessun     - i lOVE U

16) Snnop Doog - Gin and Juice (wicked)

17) Snnop Doog - Gin and Juice (wicked)

18) Super Lover Cee - Do the James (instrumental rmx)

19) Super Lover Cee - Do the James

20) Super Lover Cee - Do the James

21) Brwn Bflo - Xingo

22) Kool G Rap - On the Run (Al Capaone Mix)

23) Kool G Rap - On the Run (Al Capaone Mix)

24) The Game/WC - West Coast Voodoo

25) Public Enemy - House of the Rising Son

26) Public Enemy - House of the Rising Son

27) Tone Loc - Underground Mafia - Caught Up In The System (Down Low Vocal)

28) Underground Mafia - The Godfather-instrumental

29) Martin Luther King Jr. - Excerpt From Speech The Day Before His Death

30) Martin Luther King Jr. - Excerpt From Speech The Day Before His Death

31) Tone Loc - Cool hand Loc (instrumental)

32) Tone Loc - Cool Hand Loc

33) Tone Loc - Cool Hand Loc

34) Tone Loc - Cool hand Loc (instrumental)

35) Public Enemy - How Low Can U Go (white label rmx)

36) Malcolm X - I’m A Field Negro

37) Souls Of Mischief - 93 Til Infinity INSTRUMENTAL FINAL

38) Stezo - It’s My Turn final

39) Stezo - It’s My Turn final

40) Azeem - Latin Revenge

41) Super Lover Cee & Casanova Rudd - Super Casanova-instrumental final

42) Super Lover Cee & Casanova Rudd - Super Casanova-instrumental final

43) Da Lench Mob - Goin’ Bananas

44) Phase N Rhythm - Hook N Sling (instrumental)

45) speech-CharlesBarron-fullspeech

1:34:14  Phase N Rhythm     - Swollen Pockets (instrumental)

1:35:03  Phase N Rhythm     - Swollen Pockets

1:37:05  Phase N Rhythm     - Swollen Pockets (instrumental)

1:37:41  Tone Loc     - Underground Mafia - Caught Up In The System (Down Low Vocal)

1:39:37  Real Roxanne     - Bang Zoom-LetsGo

1:41:33  Diamond D     - Sally Got a One-Track Mind

1:41:58  Diamond d     - Confused

1:44:12  Real Roxanne     - Bang Zoom-LetsGo

1:46:29  Beats & Breaks     - Trouble Funk Express-105

1:47:07  Real Roxanne     - Bang Zoom-LetsGo

1:48:56  Beats & Breaks     - Trouble Funk Express-105

1:51:13  EU     - Knock Him Out Sugar Ray

1:54:02  Beats & Breaks     - Heaven & Hell-108

1:56:21  Beats & Breaks     - Bustin Loose (Chuck Brown)

1:58:41  Beats & Breaks     - Jam on the Groove-112

2:03:18  Beats & Breaks     - I Just Wanna Do My Thing (Edwin Starr)-104

2:06:41  Beats & Breaks (BonesBreaks)     - Shafted Off-119

2:07:57  Beats & Breaks (Yellow Magic Orchestra)     - Computer Game-120

2:08:14  Beats & Breaks     - Willie Chase-119

2:09:10  Beats & Breaks (BonesBreaks)     - Bacardi 151 Beats-126

2:11:53  Speech-MMM-Youth-jenniferReid

2:12:44  Speech-BeingMisled

2:14:30  Beats & Breaks (Aleem)     - Release Yourself-119

2:16:24  NWA     - One Hundred Miles Running

2:19:39  LL Cool J     - I’m That Type of Guy

2:23:31  Eric B & Rakim     - Juice (Know The Ledge)

2:24:59  Eric B. & Rakim     - Know the Ledge final

2:25:53  The Pace-Setters     - Jesse Jackson

2:30:20  King Soloman     - Politician Rag

2:32:57  The Temptations     - Cloud Nine

2:36:49  Sly & the Family Stone     - Life

2:37:51  Brothers Johnsons     - Stomp!

2:41:01  JAMIE PRINCIPAL     - COLD COLD WORLD

2:43:45  KC Flight     - KC Flight-Summer Madness

2:45:56  Work It To The Bone - Classic House - electro-192

2:50:05  Todd Terry     - Scat Cat-121

2:51:23  Missy Mist     - Make It Mellow

2:51:57  Missy Mist     - Make It Mellow (instrumental)

2:53:09  Malcolm X     - Police Brutality and Mob Violence

2:53:30  Malcolm X     - Government and Integration

2:54:23  Santana     - Evil Ways

2:55:42  Love Unlimited Orchestra     - Spanish Lei

Here’s a few stories and updates on the recent tragic shooting of 19 year old Kenneth Harding this past Saturday in the SF Bayview district… First we have our Hard Knock Radio coverage where we spoke to several witnesses to the shooting along with community activists. Folks we talk to in the Bayview vehemently refute the accounts given by the police who claim Harding shot at them. Witnesses we spoke to in the Bayview say that’s not true.

Michael Rapaport along with Davey D, Tajai & A-Plus of Souls Of Mischief, at SF’s weekly event P.S.T w/ Fran Boogie & Dj Sake One as they celebrate the release of the highly anticipated A Tribe Called Quest documentary, Beats Rhymes & Life.

With the Pelican Bay prison hunger strike entering its third week, mediators reported Thursday that the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) has responded to pressure from strikers and outside supporters, beginning initial negotiations with strike leaders in the prison’s Security Housing Unit, along with an outside mediation team.

Today is Nelson Mandela’s 93rd birthday… In looking back one may ask.. did he let the White Afrikaners who brutalized Black South Africans off to easy with his Truth and Reconciliation program?

Hunger Strike Rally at CDCR Headquarters Today In Sacramento

Hunger Strike Rally at CDCR Headquarters

With Strike in Third Week, CDCR Continues to Reject Prisoner Demands

What: Rally in Support of Pelican Bay Hunger Strikers

Where: CDCR Headquarters, 1515 S St, Sacramento 

When: Monday July 18th, 20111pm

 

Oakland – Prisoners’ families and community members will gather at 1pm today outside the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) headquarters in Sacramento to rally in support of prisoners on hunger strike at Pelican Bay State Prison. Last week the leaders of the strike decided to continue striking because the CDCR failed to address any of their five core demands during negotiations. The strike, now in its third week, is reaching a critical point with reports of dozens of striking prisoners being taken to the infirmary because of irregular heartbeats or fainting.  Most prisoners have lost 20-35 pounds. “What’s most troubling is that the CDCR has not offered anything substantial in response to the prisoner’s demands, which include an end to long term solitary confinement,” says Carol Strickman, a lawyer with Legal Services for Prisoners with Children and member of the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity legal team. Strickman also notes, “Some of these guys have been in the Security Housing Unit (SHU) for 20 years or more and are suffering the severe affects of being locked in a 6 x 10 concrete cell for 23 ½ hours a day. What they are asking for are basic human rights.”

 

At least 400 prisoners at Pelican Bay continue to refuse food and thousands more around the state are striking in solidarity, including CCI Tehachapi, Corcoran, Centinela, Calipatria, RJ Donovan, San Quentin, Valley State Prison for Women, and Folsom, making it the largest hunger strike in the history of the embattled California prison system. The system, under federal receivership, has been court ordered to release 33,000 prisoners because of medical neglect caused by severe overcrowding. “We are urging our state representatives and Governor Brown to step in and force the CDCR to recognize the prisoners’ demands,” says Manuel LaFontaine, an organizer with All of Us or None, “The California prison system is already responsible for prisoner deaths because it provides substandard medical care. California’s lawmakers need to step up and take action against the situation at Pelican Bay.”

 

Mediators and lawyers who have spoken with hunger strikers at Pelican Bay say they remain committed despite having not eaten for 18 days. Some have said they are willing to strike to the death unless their demands are met. Dorsey Nunn, a member of the mediation team points out, “The hunger strikers believe that this is the only way they can get the CDCR to rectify the conditions they are experiencing in the SHU. They believe they have no other recourse.”

 

Supporters of the strikers will continue to hold rallies and events to highlight the situation at Pelican Bay and to show solidarity with the prisoners. For more information and regular updates, visit prisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com.

Remember when DC was Chocolate City? I guess thats a thing of the past.. Better listen to this song and treat it as ancient history.. Love Live Chuck Brown and the Soul Searchers..Peep this NY Times article..

WASHINGTON — This city, the country’s first to have an African-American majority and one of its earliest experiments in black self-government, is passing a milestone.

Washington’s black population slipped below 50 percent this year, possibly in February, about 51 years after it gained a majority, according to an estimate by William Frey, the senior demographer at the Brookings Institution.

The shift is passing without much debate, but it is leaving ripples of resentment in neighborhoods across the city, pitting some of the city’s long-term residents, often African-American, against affluent newcomers, most of whom are white, over issues as mundane as church parking and chicken wings.

continue reading HERE


bremser:

Oscar Grant’s photograph of  Johannes Mehserle
Oscar Grant’s photograph of transit police officer Johannes Mehserle is rare: a portrait of the photographer’s killer. Unlike the  recent photograph that a politician captured in the Philippines, Grant’s photograph, taken moments before Mehserle shot him in the back, was intentional.
Much of the media attention given to the Oscar Grant case focused on a handful of videos made by other passengers on the BART train, some of which show Grant being shot. While being detained by BART police, Grant called his ex-girlfriend Sophina Mesa twice from the platform. During this time he also took the photo of Mehserle and sent it to Mesa. Grant’s photograph of Mehserle did not get as much coverage as the videos, as it wasn’t released until the trial began.
Grant’s photograph raises an important issue that faces every American: the right to photograph, videotape and document while being  detained or arrested by the police. Many of us assume we have this right, but with existing  wiretapping laws, you can still be arrested and your camera confiscated. Radley Balko’s Reason.com article “The War on Cameras” is essential reading on this subject.
Demian Bulwa is a reporter and editor for the San Francisco Chronicle, who has covered the Oscar Grant case since the shooting, through the entire Mehserle trial. I asked him a few questions over the phone about this photograph.
How did the prosecution and defense use this photograph as evidence in the trial?
Both sides used flat screen TVs, multimedia, everything was timed and choreographed. It seemed they felt they might lose credibility if they weren’t sharp with multimedia. At times the arguments felt like PowerPoint presentations. There were photos, quotes, videos, video of the Taser training.
It was used by prosecution to show two things: 1. that he [Mehserle] knew his Taser from his gun, that he had actually taken out his Taser twice, that he knew full well between the two weapons. 2. That Oscar was being abused and was concerned about it.
It was one of many pieces of evidence. It’s part of the puzzle, and hard to tell which ones stuck with the jury.
What facts were presented about the photograph, when it was taken? Did he take it while face down, turning around?
Grant was sitting on the ground. The guys were sitting on the edge of the platform for a while. He wouldn’t have had the opportunity in the last moments, the officers were on top of him, with his arms behind him.
Was there any suggestion by either side that taking this photograph provoked Mehserle, or was some form of resisting arrest?
I don’t recall.
Based on the evidence in the trial, and your own speculation, why do you think Oscar Grant took this photograph?
Most likely he was documenting unfair treatment. He said something to his girlfriend [during the phone call], like “I’m getting beat up here.” It was a way of documenting that, and putting Mehserle on notice. If you take a picture of someone you are saying: I’m watching your behavior. You’re accountable. You are expressing your concern and putting them on notice.

bremser:

Oscar Grant’s photograph of Johannes Mehserle

Oscar Grant’s photograph of transit police officer Johannes Mehserle is rare: a portrait of the photographer’s killer. Unlike the recent photograph that a politician captured in the Philippines, Grant’s photograph, taken moments before Mehserle shot him in the back, was intentional.

Much of the media attention given to the Oscar Grant case focused on a handful of videos made by other passengers on the BART train, some of which show Grant being shot. While being detained by BART police, Grant called his ex-girlfriend Sophina Mesa twice from the platform. During this time he also took the photo of Mehserle and sent it to Mesa. Grant’s photograph of Mehserle did not get as much coverage as the videos, as it wasn’t released until the trial began.

Grant’s photograph raises an important issue that faces every American: the right to photograph, videotape and document while being detained or arrested by the police. Many of us assume we have this right, but with existing wiretapping laws, you can still be arrested and your camera confiscated. Radley Balko’s Reason.com article “The War on Cameras” is essential reading on this subject.

Demian Bulwa is a reporter and editor for the San Francisco Chronicle, who has covered the Oscar Grant case since the shooting, through the entire Mehserle trial. I asked him a few questions over the phone about this photograph.

How did the prosecution and defense use this photograph as evidence in the trial?

Both sides used flat screen TVs, multimedia, everything was timed and choreographed. It seemed they felt they might lose credibility if they weren’t sharp with multimedia. At times the arguments felt like PowerPoint presentations. There were photos, quotes, videos, video of the Taser training.

It was used by prosecution to show two things: 1. that he [Mehserle] knew his Taser from his gun, that he had actually taken out his Taser twice, that he knew full well between the two weapons. 2. That Oscar was being abused and was concerned about it.

It was one of many pieces of evidence. It’s part of the puzzle, and hard to tell which ones stuck with the jury.

What facts were presented about the photograph, when it was taken? Did he take it while face down, turning around?

Grant was sitting on the ground. The guys were sitting on the edge of the platform for a while. He wouldn’t have had the opportunity in the last moments, the officers were on top of him, with his arms behind him.

Was there any suggestion by either side that taking this photograph provoked Mehserle, or was some form of resisting arrest?

I don’t recall.

Based on the evidence in the trial, and your own speculation, why do you think Oscar Grant took this photograph?

Most likely he was documenting unfair treatment. He said something to his girlfriend [during the phone call], like “I’m getting beat up here.” It was a way of documenting that, and putting Mehserle on notice. If you take a picture of someone you are saying: I’m watching your behavior. You’re accountable. You are expressing your concern and putting them on notice.